Officials rush to contain virus | Top Vip News


  • Oregon officials are racing to contain the bubonic plague outbreak in the state.
  • The unnamed local is believed to have contracted the plague from his cat.



Oregon officials are racing to contain an outbreak of bubonic plague after announcing the state’s first case since 2015.

The unnamed resident is believed to have contracted the plague from his symptomatic cat, health officials said Wednesday.

“All close contacts of the resident and his pet have been contacted and provided medications to prevent illness,” Dr. Richard Fawcett, Deschutes County health officer, said in a statement.

There is little risk to the community as the case was identified and treated in the early stages of the disease, Fawcett said.

According to officials, no more cases of plague have emerged during the investigation of communicable diseases.

Oregon officials are racing to contain an outbreak of bubonic plague after announcing the state’s first case since 2015.

This is the first case of bubonic plague in Oregon since a 16-year-old boy contracted the disease in 2015.

The teen became ill after being bitten by an infected flea during a hunting trip near Heppner, Morrow County.

There have been eight cases in the state in the previous 20 years and none have resulted in deaths.

In 2012, an Oregon man lost his fingers and toes to the plague. He also contracted the disease from his cat after trying to remove a mouse from its throat.

The unidentified resident is believed to have contracted the plague from his symptomatic cat, health officials said Wednesday.

The infectious bacterial disease is transmitted by squirrels, chipmunks, and other wild rodents and their fleas.

When an infected rodent becomes ill and dies, its fleas can transmit the infection to other animals or humans through their bites.

It is treatable with antibiotics if caught early, but can be fatal if left untreated. Bubonic plague is characterized by high fever, lethargy, and swollen lymph nodes.

There is currently no vaccine available against plague.

Officials recommend that people avoid any contact with wild rodents, especially sick or dead ones, and never feed squirrels or chipmunks.

Pet owners are also advised to keep pets away from wild rodents to avoid infection.

Leave a Comment