‘Sex and the City’ is back, and Generation Z won’t be able to cope

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Rikki Schlott

Entertainment

While re-watching “Sex and the City” this week, I couldn’t help but wonder… will Generation Z have a complete meltdown and cancel Carrie Bradshaw?

The classic New York comedy has just begun streaming on Netflix, exposing the daring and sexist exploits of Carrie, Samantha, Charlotte and Miranda to a new generation, many of whom weren’t even born when the series premiered in 1998. either when it ended in 2004.

And I’m not sure all my fellow Zoomers are ready to travel back in time to a time when apparently no one batted an eye at cultural appropriation or gay jokes. Not to mention a character who casually admires Donald Trump.

“Sex and the City” began streaming on Netflix on April 1. HBO

But the name of the future president appears right in the premiere of the series, when Samantha describes Carrie’s main love interest, Mr. Big, as the “next Donald Trump.”

Reader, that is a sincere compliment.

If young viewers continue watching Season 2, they’ll see Trump himself—thinner, younger, still a fan of spray tan—looking at Samantha Jones (Kim Cattrall) at a cocktail bar.

Says narrator Carrie Bradshaw (Sarah Jessica Parker): “Samantha, a cosmopolitan, and Donald Trump… it just doesn’t get more New York than that.”

Samantha Jones controversially wore an afro wig at a party for the show. HBO

Something tells me there will never be a flashback of that in the painfully politically correct “SATC” reboot, “And Just Like That.”

“Donald Trump just happened to show up. They were right, maybe Gen Z isn’t ready for this.” a user.

As someone who was just a teenager when Trump launched his 2016 presidential campaign, I have to admit that watching him get ogled in a sitcom was something of a shock.

Donald Trump (back right) appears in a brief cameo in the second season of “Sex and the City.” HBO
Zoom users have already expressed surprise at seeing a younger Trump (right) on the show. HBO
Most members of Generation Z don’t remember Trump from his pre-presidential days. @Nosananol1fe/

But there are plenty of more inflammatory moments, like when cougar Samantha tells her much younger boyfriend in Season 6, “You should stay at the party, Harvey Weinstein is here!”

I hope new viewers will scoff hearing Carrie describe her jewelry as “ghetto gold” and seeing Samantha in an afro wig and a hair stick.

Xers are gearing up for Generation Z’s analysis of “Sex and the City.” @wetpoopcorn /X

I also don’t think they’ll appreciate when she dates a black man in season 3 and announces, “I don’t see color. I see conquests.”

But it’s not just Cattrall’s character that is on the brink of cancellation.

“Watching Sex and the City on Netflix and I don’t know, you Carrie, it seems really problematic.” a user.

Zoomers have already talked about canceling Carrie Bradshaw on social media. Everett Collection

Already in X, the program has been declared “literally the most problematic show for women” that “DOES NOT AGE WELL.” Also has been nicknamed “Toxic Dating Boot Camp”.

Only the professional wife crowd will enjoy Charlotte York’s take on female independence: “Everyone needs a man, that’s why I rent. If you are a landlord and he is still renting, then the power structure is off. It’s emasculating. “Men don’t want a woman who is too self-sufficient.”

Zoom users watching the show on Netflix criticize Carrie Bradshaw for being “problematic.” @jenjoliesoscar /X

Today, women’s magazines and shows like “Euphoria” constantly remind us that we live in the age of fluidity. One in five Gen Z women identify as bisexual according to a recent Gallup poll.

But in an episode of the third season of “SATC” from 2000, Carrie breaks up with her boyfriend because he is bisexual.

“I’m not even sure bisexuality exists. “I think it’s just a stopover on the way to Gay Town,” he tells his friends over brunch.

In a controversial episode, Carrie says she doesn’t believe bisexuality exists. ©HBO/Courtesy Everett Collection

Your answer? Miranda (Cynthia Nixon) proceeds to call bisexuality “greedy.” Charlotte agrees: “Pick a side and stay there!”

Indicate activation warnings. People who justly enjoy Miranda, as my colleague Kirsten Fleming once wrote, “topless in a hot tub with her non-binary lover” in “And Just Like That,” won’t be able to stand it.

“SATC” creator Darren Star once said that New York City was the show’s unofficial “fifth character.” So it makes sense that the Big Apple would also engage in politically incorrect actions.

When Samantha moves to the then-trendy Meatpacking District, she complains about “paying a fortune to live in a neighborhood that’s hip during the day and transgender at night,” a reference to the transgender prostitutes who used to frequent the West End.

A story about transgender prostitutes in the Meatpacking District is sure to attract attention. HBO

I can already imagine the screams from the dormitories of Columbia and NYU, echoing throughout the city.

Look, I understand that a lot of what was cutting edge back then isn’t so clever anymore. But I also know how to put aside my modern sensibilities and appreciate a piece of entertainment in its cultural context.

I can see why this gained enormous popularity: it tells truths about the female experience in a post-sexual revolution world with remarkable (and, yes, raw) candour.

Netflix should not give in to the outraged crowd and censor “Sex and the City.” Copy color slide

“Sex and the City” had to walk so “Girls” could run. And that, no doubt, will someday seem painfully out of step, too.

What worries me is people who might want to erase history because it offends a new generation.

“Friends,” which ended the same year as “SATC,” had fragments selectively edited of its Netflix iteration.

And an entire episode of “The Office,” one that poked fun at diversity, was powered by Comedy Central in reruns.

At least “Sex and the City” wasn’t boring, unlike its reboot “…And Just Like That” (above). ZUMAPRESS.com

The “problematic” behavior of Carrie, Samantha, Charlotte and Miranda might not be in style today. And that shouldn’t matter.

In my opinion, it is better to be edgy, provocative and even offensive than woke, preachy and boring like today’s “SATC” reboot.




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